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October 6, 2013

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The Choice to Shrink or Not Shrink

May 22, 2013

 

For many, the decision whether or not to see a therapist seems monumental and scary, especially if it is the first time. Let me take the fright out of you. Seeing a therapist can be the most soothing of all processes IF you choose the right one. I always suggest to those who contact me that they shop around. First, make sure your therapist has experience in your particular concern. Second, It is totally necessary to immediately feel a connection with the therapist; feel that they are someone easy to talk to and easy to be honest with. Those are the two primary keys. You will know immediately when you have found the right person. . . you just know.

 

Therapy is confidential, which should give you great confidence when talking to someone. Short of a court order, a therapist must keep your confidentiality unless they feel you are a danger to yourself or to someone else. If your own mother called, the therapist would deny even knowing you – that;’s how serious the bonds of confidentiality go. Information can only be released with your signed release specifying exactly what information can be shared and with whom it can be shared.

 

Therapy is not a punishment or cause to stick your tail between your legs. It is a treat you give yourself to solve the issues that need another set of trained ears. With the right therapist, you will find that you look forward to therapy, often holding in big pieces of information until your hour. Try to find a therapist who will bend the boundaries a little and take mid-week phone calls. Some things are just too difficult to hold and your therapist knows that. If they are a stickler for keeping all within your time slot – guess what – that’s the wrong therapist. No one can handle a daily client call, but no one who is in this helping business should turn a client away. If they do, guess what? Wrong therapist.

 

Being a therapist is not easy, but those of us who choose this profession do so because we legitimately want to help people. So put your skittish thoughts aside and make a few calls. There is no trade in for finding the relief I know you can get.

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